Picture 262 wax resist fairy wings

Eco-Friendly Fairy and Dragon Wings.

Written by creative on . Posted in Blog, Creative Experiences, Pre-schoolers, Primary School Children, Toddlers

We were collecting quite a few fairy wings that were becoming a bit tattered (thanks to Miss Two who believes fairy wings should be worn every day and every where), so we decided the best way to salvage them was to recycle them. We did this by using my children’s artwork (another touch of recycling) and the art we chose involved recycling old crayons.

The results were gorgeous and now my children have their own one-of-a-kind fairy/dragon wings that are stunning. Recycling never looked so good.

Materials:

- A pair of old fairy wings (to remove the fabric section that makes up the wings so that the frame can be re-used)

- Children’s artwork. For this particular example, some wax resist paintings were used to make the wings (process outlined below)

- Fake flowers or embellishments to add to centre of the wings.

- Scissors

- Clear tape

- Clear contact (if you wish to cover the frames of the wings and artwork for durability)

Materials for wax resist paintings (this is optional, you could choose to include any type of artwork you want to recycle for the wings):

- Crayon shavings from wax crayons (recycle old, or broken, wax crayons by grating them and creating shavings).

- Water colour paper or thick paper

- Water colour paints

- Paint brushes

- Grease proof baking paper

- Iron

Process for wax resist paintings:

- Sprinkle crayon shavings onto water colour or thick paper. You don’t want to cover all of the paper with shavings, more of a random sprinkle, but not too generous.

Adult job: Cover the paper containing the crayon shavings with a sheet of grease proof baking paper. Then iron over the crayon shavings so that they melt (you only need a couple of seconds with a hot iron). The technique  involves pressing and lifting the hot iron over the crayon shavings, as opposed to gliding the iron over the paper. If you glide the iron over the crayon shavings it smears the melted crayon.

Once the crayon shavings have been melted and the grease proof paper removed it looks something like this:

Use water colour paints to paint over the melted wax crayon shavings (once they are no longer hot). The paint resists the wax crayon and makes for a beautiful effect.

When you hold these paintings up to the sun light, the light shines through the crayon almost like a stained glass effect.

Another example of the effect that this technique produces (when the water colour paints are still wet sprinkle salt over the wet paint to create the star burst effect you can see mostly on the left hand side of the photo below):

Perfect art for fairy, or dragon wings and fairies and dragons that like to play outside. The sun shining through these wings makes them look gorgeous.

- While the water colour paints are wet, add a sprinkle of glitter to the paper if desired.

- While the paintings are drying, remove the fabric from the frame of the old fairy/dragon wings.

- Trace around the fairy/dragon wing frames onto the artwork. Older children can then cut the fairy/dragon wing pieces out. Younger children will require an adult to cut the fairy/dragon pieces from their artwork.

- Use sticky tape to secure the fairy/dragon wing pieces to the fairy/dragon wing frames.

- You may like to add adhesive gems to the wings for an extra touch of sparkle.

- Cover in clear contact for durability.

Dragon wings:

This has turned out to be a wonderful way to use artwork, get rid of those old crayons and breath some life into old fairy wings.

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Comments (8)

  • Jode

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    What a fabulous recycling idea and don’t they look so colourful and unique? So much better than the original ones I bet! Thanks for sharing…pretty sure I will need to do this soon as my girls are really embracing their fairy wings now!!

    Reply

    • creative

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      Thanks Jode for stopping by and taking the time to leave a comment. It’s all about fairy wings here too at the moment. My two girls are both fairy loving girls, hence lots of fairy art happening over here :)

      Reply

    • creative

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      Hi Katie, thank you for your comment. It sure is a fun way to “use” children’s artwork and create gorgeous fairy/dragon wings.

      Reply

    • creative

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      Hi Jackie, thank you for visiting and your comment. We love this technique for making all sorts of beautiful creations as the patters are always stunning.

      Reply

  • Danya Banya

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    They look fantastic! Much brighter than your usual store-bought wings. I love them!

    Reply

    • creative

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      Thank you for visiting and your kind comment. They certainly are one-of-a-kind wings :)

      Reply

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